17 Ways to Use Ostrich Oil

17 Ways to Use Ostrich Oil

Our ostrich oil is highly moisturizing, anti-inflammatory oil packed with skin-loving Omegas 3, 6, & 9.  We have found that its uses go far beyond skin moisturizing (although it works very well for that!).  Here's a list of the many, many ways our customers use ostrich oil:

How to use ostrich oil.

  • overall skin moisturizer
  • helps wounds heal faster
  • aids in normalization of tissue
  • prevents and reduces scars and stretch-marks
  • reduces itching & redness
  • relieves sunburn and prevents peeling
  • soothes and replenishes skin after shaving
  • promotes scalp, hair, and joint health
  • boosts the effectiveness of other skincare products by deeply penetrating skin
  • helps clear eczema and is gentle on even the most sensitive skin
  • soothes inflamed joints
  • restores dry, chapped skin
  • excellent beard conditioner
  • heals cracked, dry feet
  • prevent skin aging
  • lighten age spots
  • soothe bug bites

Ostrich oil made in Boise, Idaho

Have you tried our ostrich oil?  We'd love to hear how you use it, let us know in the comments below, and visit our ostrich oil product page here to learn more and buy now!

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