7 Ostrich Recipes That You're Definitely Going to Want to Try Right Away

7 Ostrich Recipes That You're Definitely Going to Want to Try Right Away

If you have not tried ostrich meat then you must have had your head in the sand!  Terrible jokes aside, Ostrich meat is seriously good.  Not only is it tasty, but it is also lean, easy to cook, and is becoming a popular alternative for premium beef lovers.

Once you get your ostrich meat, what exactly are you supposed to do with it?  Below are our top 7 delicious ostrich recipes that you just have to try.  If you like what you see here but want more options or detailed preparation instructions, check out the detailed ostrich meat recipe library at www.americanostrichfarms.com/blogs/recipes.  

1. Perfect, Easy Ostrich Steak Recipe

Ostrich is extremely similar to a traditional beef filet mignon.  It cooks particularly quickly, due to its lean texture and lack of fat.  Finally, because of the bold, beefy flavor, fight the urge to drown it in complicated sauces and marinades and go for a simple ostrich steak recipe.

Rub the steak in garlic, black pepper, sea salt, and olive oil.  Refrigerate in the simple marinade for several hours. 

Heat your pan to medium with a dash of oil in it and place the steak in the pan for around 2 1/2 minutes per side.  The steak will continue to cook after you have removed it from the heat AND due to the lower fat content in ostrich, it will cook more quickly than a typical beef steak, so bear this in mind so you don't overdo it. 

Serve to the same desired internal temperature/doneness you prefer for beef with any root vegetable side dish.

2. Bacon Wrapped Ostrich With a Red Wine Reduction

This is a variation on three classic flavors, working on the assumption that everyone loves bacon and wine :)  Aside from the meats and wine, you will need onion, carrot, leek, beef stock or ostrich bone broth, fresh rosemary and thyme, and butcher's twine.  Start by heating the oven to 450F.

Score the meat along the top then season it with the herbs, placing them inside the shallow score marks.  Wrap the ostrich in bacon, and hold it in place with butcher's twine.  Place it in a large roasting tray with the vegetables.

Cook the meat for 15 minutes then turn down the cooking temp to 200 degrees for another 30 minutes.  You may need to adjust this depending on the size of your filet.  When your desired internal temperature is reached (we recommend 125F for medium-rare), take it out, cover, and let it rest.

Add wine and stock to the meat juices left in the roasting dish and simmer on the stove while your meat is resting.  Add heat and/or time until the sauce has reduced and is thick and rich to your liking.

3. Ostrich Meatballs and Plum Sauce

This recipe combines Swedish meatballs with an oriental plum sauce that, on paper, you would not expect to work!  However, this is a breathtaking combination that will leave you scrambling for second helpings.  For this recipe, in addition to ground ostrich meat, you will need cumin, coriander, paprika, parsley, garlic, salt, pepper, breadcrumbs, and 2 onions.

You will need a bottle of plum sauce.  If you are feeling really adventurous you could even make it yourself (it's easier than you think).

Mix all the ingredients except the plum sauce.  Roll the mix into a number of small meatballs.  Place them on a plate and let them form up for a few hours in a refrigerator. 

Add the plum sauce to a pan, and place it on medium heat until bubbling.  Place the meatballs in the sauce to cook for about 20 minutes or until they are cooked through.  Remove and serve!

4. Ostrich and Quinoa Meatballs

This recipe works exactly the same as the one above, except swap the breadcrumbs for approximately 1 cup of cooked quinoa.  Also, replace your herbs with ginger, garlic, fresh chili, a dash of honey, and red curry paste.

The recipe will pack a huge protein punch with very low fat and calories.  The amazing nutrition stats on this dish are perfect for athletes or anyone trying to avoid "simple" carbs.  

5. Gnocchi With Ostrich Ragu

Essentially an Italian ostrich stew recipe, this dish is simple and hearty.  You will need gnocchi, ground ostrich meat, celery, carrot, onions, red wine, tomato puree, and basil. 

Finely chop the onion, celery, and carrot then sauté in a pan.  Next, add the meat and brown it until there is no pink remaining.  When the juices start to run low, add the red wine a dash at a time.

Add the tomato puree along with a little warm water, season, and simmer on low heat for 45 minutes.  For a more saucy ragu, add more water or wine and cover the pan while simmering to avoid moisture loss.  When done, add the ragu to cooked gnocchi and serve with sprigs of ripped basil. 

6. Ostrich Goulash Recipe

This is a great one-pot ostrich stew with a lot of interesting old-world ingredients.  Start by browning your ground ostrich meat along with some onions in a large pot on the stove.

Add chopped chili and garlic and then canned tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked and sweet paprika, oregano, lemon zest, and some beef or ostrich broth and Worcestershire sauce for added depth of flavor.  Bring it to a boil, then turn down the heat and let it simmer, covered, for around 1.5 hours.

If you want a real authentic Hungarian goulash, add chunks of green peppers and water the stew down so it is more like a soup.  Serve on its own, over spaetzle, or another grain or pasta.  If you want to really go old school, cook it outdoors over an open fire!

7. Ostrich Topped Nachos

This is a fantastic, easy-to-cook dish that is great for sharing.  Start by preheating the oven to 400F and add a little oil to a casserole dish.  Brown your ground ostrich meat, then do the same with chopped onion.

Add garlic, sliced yellow peppers, and a Mexican spice blend to the dish.  Saute, then add canned tomatoes.  Bring them to a boil and then reduce the heat and allow to simmer for around 15 minutes before adding corn and kidney beans.

Place tortilla chips in a serving dish, pour the sauce over the top, and cover with generous amounts of grated cheese.  Once that cheese is melted, sprinkle with fresh cilantro and it's game on! 

Serve Ostrich Recipes with Red Wine

As Ostrich meat is red meat with a delicate flavor, preferred wine pairings include light-bodied reds.  Heavier, or more fruit-forward wines may overpower the lean meat.  For non-wine drinkers, try it with an APA beer, IPA, or a light lager.

If these brief ostrich recipes are getting your mouth watering, please visit the full ostrich recipe library at www.americanostrichfarms.com/blogs/recipes.  AOF ships the highest quality meats directly to homes and businesses across the United States and you can browse the online store and get Free Shipping on orders over $199 today!


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